Advertisement

Radiation Oncology and Related Oncology Fields in the Face of the 2011 “Triple Disaster” in Fukushima, Japan

  • Akihiko Ozaki
    Correspondence
    Reprint requests to: Akihiko Ozaki, MD, Department of Surgery, Minamisoma Municipal General Hospital, 2-54-6 Takamicho, Haramachi, Minamisoma, Fukushima 975-0033, Japan. Tel: (+81) 244-223181
    Affiliations
    Department of Surgery, Minamisoma Municipal General Hospital, Minamisoma, Fukushima, Japan

    Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Graduate School of Public Health, Teikyo University, Tokyo, Japan
    Search for articles by this author
  • Masaharu Tsubokura
    Affiliations
    Department of Internal Medicine, Soma Central Hospital, Soma, Fukushima, Japan
    Search for articles by this author
      Natural disasters are on the rise owing to global warming (
      • Fonzieri G.
      • Cescatti A.
      • e Silva F.B.
      • et al.
      Increasing risk over time of weather-related hazards to the European population: A data-driven prognostic study.
      ), and their widespread health consequences are drawing increased attention. Cancer management during and after disasters can be regarded as an area that may see particular health consequences, given that cancer is among the leading causes of mortality and morbidity and that timely provision of medical services, an indispensable component of cancer management, can be hindered in disaster settings, significantly impacting oncology services (
      • Twombly R.
      Cancer community offers unprecedented support after hurricanes slam U.S. Gulf Coast.
      ). Radiation oncology is an essential element of cancer care, and it has been suggested that a delay and/or interruption in radiation therapy can adversely affect the prognosis of cancer patients. Understanding the full effects of disasters on cancer management, and on radiation oncology specifically, is thus crucial for disaster preparedness and responses to secure the health and well-being of disaster victims. However, there are few reports that provide a comprehensive overview of radiation oncology in the wake of disasters.
      To read this article in full you will need to make a payment
      ASTRO Member Login
      ASTRO Members, full access to the journal is a member benefit. Use your society credentials to access all journal content and features.
      One-time access price info
      • For academic or personal research use, select 'Academic and Personal'
      • For corporate R&D use, select 'Corporate R&D Professionals'

      Purchase one-time access:

      Already a print subscriber? Claim online access
      Already an online subscriber? Sign in
      Institutional Access: Sign in to ScienceDirect

      References

        • Fonzieri G.
        • Cescatti A.
        • e Silva F.B.
        • et al.
        Increasing risk over time of weather-related hazards to the European population: A data-driven prognostic study.
        Lancet Planet Health. 2017; 1: e200-e208
        • Twombly R.
        Cancer community offers unprecedented support after hurricanes slam U.S. Gulf Coast.
        J Natl Cancer Inst. 2005; 97: 1716-1718
        • Hasegawa A.
        • Tanigawa K.
        • Ohtsuru A.
        • et al.
        Health effects of radiation and other health problems in the aftermath of nuclear accidents, with an emphasis on Fukushima.
        Lancet. 2015; 386: 479-488
        • Secretarist for Contaminated Water and Decommissioning Issues Team
        • Cabinet Office
        • Government of Japan
        Revision of the Mid- and Long-Term Roadmap.
        (Available at:)
        • United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effect of Atomic Radiation
        Follow-Up to UNSCEAR 2013 Report on Fukushima-Daiichi Accident.
        (Available at:)
        www.unscear.org/docs/reports/2015/Fukushima_WP2015_web_en.pdf
        Date: 2015
        Date accessed: November 17, 2017
        • Nomura S.
        • Blangiardo M.
        • Tsubokura M.
        • et al.
        Postnuclear disaster evacuation and chronic health in adults in Fukushima, Japan: A long-term retrospective analysis.
        BMJ Open. 2016; 6: e010080
        • World Nuclear Association
        World Nuclear Performace Report 2017.
        (Available at:)
        • Carli P.
        • Pons F.
        • Levraut J.
        • et al.
        The French emergency medical services after the Paris and Nice terrorist attacks: What have we learnt?.
        Lancet. 2017; 390: 2735-2738
        • Japan Medical Association
        Japan Medical Analysis Platform.
        ([in Japanese]. Available at:)
        http://jmap.jp/
        Date: 2017
        Date accessed: November 17, 2017
        • Fukushima Prefectural Office
        The Number of Doctors in Fukushima Prefecture.
        ([in Japanese]. Available at:)
        • Ozaki A.
        • Nomura S.
        • Leppold C.
        • et al.
        Breast cancer patient delay in Fukushima, Japan following the 2011 triple disaster: A long-term retrospective study.
        BMC Cancer. 2017; 17: 423
        • Kodama Y.
        • Oikawa T.
        • Hayashi K.
        • et al.
        Impact of natural disaster combined with nuclear power plant accidents on local medical services: A case study of Minamisoma Municipal General Hospital after the Great East Japan Earthquake.
        Disaster Med Public Health Prep. 2014; 8: 471-476
        • Abeysinghe S.
        • Leppold C.
        • Ozaki A.
        • et al.
        Disappearing everyday materials: The displacement of medical resources following disaster in Fukushima, Japan.
        Soc Sci Med. 2017; 191: 117-124
        • Morita T.
        • Nomura S.
        • Tsubokura M.
        • et al.
        Excess mortality due to indirect health effects of the 2011 triple disaster in Fukushima, Japan: A retrospective observational study.
        J Epidemiol Community Health. 2017; 71: 974-980
        • Shirato H.
        A response of Japanese Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology.
        Nyuugan-no Rinsho (Clin Breast Cancer). 2011; 26 ([in Japanese]): 559-564
        • Isobe S.
        Number of deaths and missing people in the Great East Japan Earthquake.
        ([in Japanese]. Available at:)
        • Zhang H.
        • Yan W.
        • Oba A.
        • et al.
        Radiation-driven migration: The case of Minamisoma City, Fukushima, Japan, after the Fukushima nuclear accident.
        Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2014; 11: 9286-9305
        • Ozaki A.
        • Leppold C.
        • Sawano T.
        • et al.
        Social isolation and cancer management - advanced rectal cancer with patient delay following the 2011 triple disaster in Fukushima, Japan: A case report.
        J Med Case Rep. 2017; 11: 138
        • Ozaki A.
        • Tsubokura M.
        • Leppold C.
        • et al.
        The importance of family caregiving to achieving palliative care at home: A case report of end-of-life breast cancer in an area struck by the 2011 Fukushima nuclear crisis: A case report.
        Medicine (Baltimore). 2017; 96: e8721

      Linked Article

      • Radiation Therapy in a Time of Disaster
        International Journal of Radiation Oncology • Biology • PhysicsVol. 100Issue 4
        • Preview
          What constitutes a disaster? The United Nations defines it as “a serious disruption of the functioning of a community or a society [exceeding its ability] to cope” and requiring assistance from external sources, perhaps national or international (1). These bleak features—precipitous social disruption and conditions of extreme dependency and need—separate the vastness and isolation of “disaster” from other relief aid terminologies, such as “hazard,” “risk,” “emergency,” or “epidemic,” which are more anticipatory, classificatory, or managerial in nature.
        • Full-Text
        • PDF

      Comments

      Commenting Guidelines

      To submit a comment for a journal article, please use the space above and note the following:

      • We will review submitted comments as soon as possible, striving for within two business days.
      • This forum is intended for constructive dialogue. Comments that are commercial or promotional in nature, pertain to specific medical cases, are not relevant to the article for which they have been submitted, or are otherwise inappropriate will not be posted.
      • We require that commenters identify themselves with names and affiliations.
      • Comments must be in compliance with our Terms & Conditions.
      • Comments are not peer-reviewed.