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The Radiation Safety of 5G Wi-Fi: Reassuring or Russian Roulette?

      To the Editor: The impending rollout of fifth-generation (5G) Wi-Fi in mobile phones, augmenting the current fourth-generation (4G) technology toward making global interconnectivity between devices a reality, has been touted as a significant improvement of speed compared to current and previous wireless signaling (

      Hertsgaard M, Dowie M. How big wireless made us think that cell phones are safe: A special investigation. Available at: https://www.thenation.com/article/how-big-wireless-made-us-think-that-cell-phones-are-safe-a-special-investigation/. Accessed April 2, 2018.

      ). Less well explored are the potential consequences associated with this need for speed: namely, the substantial increase in biologic exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields from the 1900-2100 MHz associated with 4G to the 3500 MHz estimated median bandwidth of 5G (

      GSMA. Considerations for the 3.5 GHz IMT range: getting ready for use. May 2017. Available at: https://www.gsma.com/spectrum/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/Considerations-for-the-3.5-GHz-IMT-range-v2.pdf. Accessed April 2, 2018.

      ).
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      References

      1. Hertsgaard M, Dowie M. How big wireless made us think that cell phones are safe: A special investigation. Available at: https://www.thenation.com/article/how-big-wireless-made-us-think-that-cell-phones-are-safe-a-special-investigation/. Accessed April 2, 2018.

      2. GSMA. Considerations for the 3.5 GHz IMT range: getting ready for use. May 2017. Available at: https://www.gsma.com/spectrum/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/Considerations-for-the-3.5-GHz-IMT-range-v2.pdf. Accessed April 2, 2018.

        • Danese E.
        • Lippi G.
        • Buonocore R.
        • et al.
        Mobile phone radiofrequency exposure has no effect on DNA double strand breaks (DSB) in human lymphocytes.
        Ann Transl Med. 2017; 5: 272
        • Mugunthan N.
        • Shanmugasamy K.
        • Anbalagan J.
        • et al.
        Effects of long term exposure of 900-1800 MHz radiation emitted from 2G mobile phone on mice hippocampus–a histomorphometric study.
        J Clin Diagn Res. 2016; 10: AF01-AF06
        • Marjanovic Cermak A.M.
        • Pavicic I.
        • Trosic I.
        Oxidative stress response in SH-SY5Y cells exposed to short-term 1800 MHz radiofrequency radiation.
        J Environ Sci Health A Tox Hazard Subst Environ Eng. 2018; 53: 132-138

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